Archive for the ‘Strategy’ Category

[Global water crisis] should figure among the acute challenges to national security strategy or occupy  an equal or more prominent footing wirh transnational terrorism, criminal organizations, the profileration of nuclear weapons, and the spread of deadly technologies.

http://www.airpower.au.af.mil/apjinternational/apj-af/2012/2012-3/fra/2012_3_01_editorial.pdf

Examining US involvement in the Horn of Africa, this volume addresses the relationship between the US and the Islamic movement in this region. Peter Woodward explores the interests of the United States in the region through two cases: Sudan and Somalia. He also discusses the effects of the Eritrean-Ethiopian war on US policy and posture in the region, along with the effects of other regional wars. The book looks at the relationship between US perceptions of Islamism and brings a unique perspective to the ongoing debate over US policy in the Islamic world. It will be of interest to those working in or researching foreign policy, as well as peace, security and conflict issues.
Book by Peter Woodward

The fourth volume in the Strategic Asia series, Strategic Asia 2004 05: Confronting Terrorism in the Pursuit of Power, examines the successes and setbacks in the war on terrorism and assesses its impact on the grand strategies of major Asian powers. A chapter on the war on terrorism in the Middle East is also included.

Book by Ashley J. Tellis and Michael Wills

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0971393850/themauduitgroupA/

Essays by a diverse and distinguished group of historians, political scientists, and sociologists examine the alarms, emergencies, controversies, and confusions that have characterized America’s Cold War, the post-Cold War interval of the 1990s, and today’s “Global War on Terror.” This “Long War” has left its imprint on virtually every aspect of American life; by considering it as a whole, The Long War is the first volume to take a truly comprehensive look at America’s response to the national-security crisis touched off by the events of World War II.

Contributors consider topics ranging from grand strategy and strategic bombing to ideology and economics and assess the changing American way of war and Hollywood’s surprisingly consistent depiction of Americans at war. They evaluate the evolution of the national-security apparatus and the role of dissenters who viewed the myriad activities of that apparatus with dismay. They take a fresh look at the Long War’s civic implications and its impact on civil-military relations.

More than a military history, The Long War examines the ideas, policies, and institutions that have developed since the United States claimed the role of global superpower. This protracted crisis has become a seemingly permanent, if not defining aspect of contemporary American life. In breaking down the old and artificial boundaries that have traditionally divided the postwar period into neat historical units, this volume provides a better understanding of the evolution of the United States and U.S. policy since World War II and offers a fresh perspective on our current national security predicament.

Book by Andrew J. Bacevich

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0231131585/themauduitgroupA/

The 9/11 terrorist attacks starkly recast the U.S. debate on “rogue states.” In this new era of vulnerability, should the United States counter the dangers of weapons proliferation and state-sponsored terrorism by toppling regimes or by promoting change in the threatening behavior of their leaders? Regime Change examines the contrasting precedents set with Iraq and Libya and provides incisive analysis of the pressing crises with North Korea and Iran.

A successor to the author’s influential Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy (2000), this compelling book clarifies and critiques the terms in which today’s vital foreign policy and security debate is being conducted.

A book by Robert S. Litwak

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0801886422/themauduitgroupA/