Archive for the ‘North America’ Category

Christopher Hewitt’s comprehensive book surveys the characteristics and causes of terrorism and governmental responses to it. He also examines the organizational structure of terrorist networks, how they are financed and their ideological agendas. Groups covered include: Islamic fundamentalists, white and black racists, black nationalists, revolutionary communists, neo-Nazis, militant Jewish groups, anti-abortionists and émigré groups. This book is essential reading for students of American politics and terrorism. It also provides a highly readable account for interested readers wishing to know more about a topic which has recently become tragically relevant to world affairs.
Book by Christopher Hewitt
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Terrorism in America

Posted: July 5, 2012 in North America, Terrorism

Terrorism and terrorists have become a much talked about topic.  Terrorism is often seen as a Middle Eastern problem and terrorists are often perceived as only having a Muslim background.  It may surprise many to learn that Americans are and have been terrorists since the birth of the nation.  This book investigates and discusses many instances in which Americans were themselves the terrorists and the victims.

Book by James Michel Lutz and Brenda J. Lutz

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=1403974608/themauduitgroupA/

Compiles over 3,100 bombings, shootings, kidnappings, and robberies carried out for political or social objectives between 1954 and 2005.

American terrorism—terrorism that occurs within the United States and Puerto Rico—has been remarkably diverse in terms of the causes and ideologies of the terrorists. Here, Christopher Hewitt has compiled the details of over 3,100 bombings, shootings, kidnappings, and robberies carried out for political or social objectives between 1954 and 2005. Arranged chronologically, concise entries offer valuable ready reference information including the date of the incident, the type of incident, the group or person responsible, where the attack occurred, and the details of the act. Thematic indexes, bibliography, and thorough indexing make this an indispensable resource for students and researchers of modern political violence in America.

 Review

“Hewitt presents a chronology of terrorist events in the United States and Puerto Rico between 1954 and 2005. Simplifying the criteria for entry, Hewitt used the FBI’s definition of terrorism. Over 3,100 entries include acts of bombing, shooting, kidnapping, and robbery; groups include black militant, anti-abortion, Jewish, and other groups (foreign and domestic). Entries include date and type of event (November 10, 1971–Attempted Bombing), faction responsible, incident location, and details of the action….Readers should not bypass the introduction; it contains an excellent explanation of how crimes are defined as terrorist rather than sexually or racially motivated….Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and up; general readers.”

Book by Christopher Hewitt

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0313334188/themauduitgroupA/

Color-coded terrorism alerts are issued, then lifted with no explanation. False alarms can, like crying wolf, desensitize people to a real need to be on alert. And that psychic numbing is just one effect discussed in this book by fifteen psychologists teamed up to take a critical look at the U.S. war on terrorism. These experts are led by the Chairman of an American Psychological Association task force charged with pinpointing the effect of our anti-terrorism efforts on American mental health. Together, they present the most up-to-date and intriguing picture we have of the fallout on our own people from our own programs. The text spotlights stereotyping of foreigners, increased domestic hate crimes, fear, depression and helplessness, as well as increased militancy and belligerence, especially among students. Perhaps most disturbing in the land of the free, we also see increasing acceptance of restrictions on our personal freedoms, and acceptance of human rights violations.

Color-coded terrorism alerts are issued, then lifted with no explanation. False alarms can, like crying wolf, desensitize people to a real need to be on alert. And that psychic numbing is just one effect discussed in this book by fifteen psychologists teamed up for a critical look at the U.S. war on terrorism. These experts are led by the Chairman of the American Psychological Association task force charged with pinpointing the effect of our anti-terrorism efforts on America’s mental health. Together, they present the most up-to-date and intriguing picture we have of the fallout on our own people from our own programs. The text spotlights fueled stereotyping of foreigners, increased domestic hate crimes, fear, depression and helplessness, as well as increasing militancy and belligerence, especially among students. Perhaps most disturbing in the land of the free, our attention is drawn to growing acceptance of restrictions on our personal freedoms, and acceptance of human rights violations.

Contributors to this collection aim to give us a reality check, looking at what our national reactions to terrorism have been, how those reactions have affected the psyche of our people and whether this has made us stronger or weaker, and more or less likely to be the target for future attacks.

Book by Paul Kimmel (Editor), Chris E. Stout (Editor) 

Apocalypse Observed is about religious violence. By analyzing five of the most notorious cults of recent years, the authors present a fascinating and revealing account of religious sects and conflict. Cults covered include:
* the apocalypse at Jonestown * the Branch Davidians at Waco * the violent path of Aum Shinrikyo * the mystical apocalypse of the Solar Temple * the mass suicide of Heaven’s Gate.
Through comparative case studies and in-depth analysis, the authors show how religious violence can erupt not simply from the beliefs of the cult followers or the personalities of their leaders, but also from the way in which society responds to the cults in its midst.
Book by  John R. Hall, Philip D. Schuyler and Sylvaine Trinh

America’s Terrorism-Activism Cycles:1600 to Present,With Projections; by Dennis J.Foley. Mr Foley uses virtually all significant terrorist events in America’s history,to ‘cycle chart’ the regular and hence trend predictible,ebbs and flows in human activities. For a reference,teaching,and learning guide,a great value. As a Cycle Study, a first and only of its kind.

Book by Dennis J. Foley (Author), Time Fractuals Publications (Editor)

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=1591094496/themauduitgroupA/

In 2002, sixty prominent American intellectuals released an open letter defending the use of military force against al-Qa’ida. The letter sparked an impassioned international debate unlike any other, in which jihadists, journalists, liberal Muslims, and German pacifists engaged one another on the most pressing issues of our time: terrorism, U.S. policy, and Islam-West relations.
A valuable resource for specialist and non-specialist alike, this volume chronicles that debate and includes contributions from both sides of the political spectrum in America and the Middle East-and even from al-Qa’ida.

Review

Gathered here in one place is a remarkably comprehensive display of the clashes—some strident, some more thoughtful—over “the clash of civilizations.” There is no substitute for listening to both friends and enemies having their say in their own words. Following September 11, the question was frequently asked, “Why do they hate us so?” The Islam/West Debate is a good place to find out. But be warned that finding out will not necessarily, will not probably, result in greater hopefulness about alleviating disagreements. (First Things )
Book by David Blankenhorn (Editor), Abdou Filali-Ansary (Editor), Hassan I. Mneimneh (Editor), Alex Roberts (Editor)