Archive for the ‘Insurgency’ Category

Long before the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, awakened the United States and the Western world to the heightened level of the terrorist threat, Southeast Asia had been dealing with this threat. The bombing in Bali that killed 202 people, many of them Australian tourists, was by no means the region’s first experience with Islamic extremism, which can be traced back to the 1940s, and the Darul Islam struggle. The most recent group to emerge is Al-Jama’ah Al-Islamiyah (AJAI), the most potent Islamic terrorist organization to date in the region and the group behind the Bali bombing. Understanding the process of Talibanization in Southeast Asia, which was once an oasis of moderate Islam in the modern world, is a key to unraveling the mystery of the increased radicalization in the region.

Essentially, this involved the establishment of a political system that was more Islamic in character, either nationally or within a specific territory of a national state. This book analyzes the increasing Talibanization of Southeast Asia, a relatively new phenomenon that involves the adoption of Islamist doctrines, ideologies, and values that are largely militant in character, and that for some groups includes the adoption of violence to achieve their goals.

This has succeeded in posing one of the most serious security challenges to the region since the end of the Cold War. Jihadists are operating in small and localized cells even though the broad goals remain the same, namely, to spread sharia, establish an Islamic state, and bring down secular regimes. As most governments do not have the credibility or the expertise to diminish the threat posed by Islamist extremism, Wahhabism, and Salafism, Southeast Asia is in danger of being Talibanized in the near future.

Book by Bilveer Singh

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0275999955/themauduitgroupA/

On March 31, 2012, a series of coordinated bombings rocked the southern Thai cities of Yala and Hat Yai. In Yala, a car bomb and two motorcycle bombs detonated 10 minutes apart on a crowded street, killing 11 and wounding 106. In Hat Yai, a pickup truck loaded with two 33-pound gas tanks packed with ammonium nitrate was parked in the underground garage of the largest hotel in the city, killing three and wounding more than 300. These attacks were the worst to strike southern Thailand since 2007 and garnered domestic and international media attention.

http://www.ctc.usma.edu/posts/the-southern-thailand-insurgency-in-the-wake-of-the-march-2012-bombings

According to the Bush administration, the war in Iraq ended in May 2003 when the president pronounced mission accomplished from the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln. Yet, fighting, resistance, and American casualties continue. Stephen PelletiËre argues that it is Iraqi suspicion of the Americans’ motive—the belief that the United States is out to tear the state apart—that is fueling the current rebellion. Resistance in Iraq has become a national struggle, tied to the mood of Iraqis generally, as well as to anger fed by experiences of the whole people over the course of the last quarter century. Americans see Iraq as a failed state because they lack knowledge of those experiences and of Iraqi history. That is what PelletiËre has set out to remedy. In doing so, he relates American behavior in Iraq to the wider sphere of U.S. interests in the Persian Gulf specifically and the Middle East overall, positioning the war as part of a larger geo-political struggle that encompasses not just the Iraqis or the Iranians, but the Israelis and all of the other client states of the United States in the Middle East.

Book by Stephen C. Pelletiere

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0275992136/themauduitgroupA/

This fascinating study looks at the origins, outbreak and course of the Indonesian-Malaysian confrontation of 1963-1966, within the context of British and American policies in South East Asia during the 1960s as a whole. Matthew Jones uses new archival sources to throw fresh light on such subjects as British Colonial policy and the creation of Malaysia, Anglo-American tensions over the confrontation itself, and the diplomacy of that important, but often neglected, international dispute.
Book by Matgthew Jones

This volume of essays explores United Irish propaganda and organization, and looks at the forces of revolution before and during the 1798 rebellion. Its scope ranges from high to low politics, and it covers subjects from literary propaganda to art history and the history of religion. It also differs from earlier “bicentenary” volumes by shedding new light on “counter-revolution,” repression, and the state, and by shifting the chronological center of gravity away from 1798 toward the immediate aftermath and the longer-term consequences.

A book by Jim Smyth

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0521661099/themauduitgroupA/

Globalisation and Insurgency

Posted: July 4, 2012 in Insurgency

A book by John Mackinlay

The central proposition of this book is that global changes have altered the nature of insurgency by weakening some governments and empowering the forces that seek to overthrow them. The book identifies four distinct categories of insurgent force, and concludes that globalisation of insurgency leads inexorably to the globalisation of counter-insurgency.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0198527071/themauduitgroupA/#_

A book by Ivan Arreguín-Toft

How do the weak defeat the strong? Ivan Arreguín-Toft argues that, although many factors affect asymmetric conflict outcomes (for example, the relative power of the actors, their weapons technology, and outside support), the interaction of each actor’s strategy is the best explanation. Supporting his argument with combined statistical and comparative case study analysis, Arreguín-Toft’s strategic interaction theory has implications not only for international relations theorists, but for policy makers grappling with interstate and civil wars, as well as terrorism.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0521839769/themauduitgroupA/