Archive for the ‘Counter-Terrorism’ Category

Led by Ambassador-at-Large Daniel Benjamin, the primary mission of the Bureau of Counterterrorism (CT) is to forge partnerships with non-state actors, multilateral organizations, and foreign governments to advance the counterterrorism objectives and national security of the United States. Working with our U.S. Government counterterrorism team, CT takes a leading role in developing coordinated strategies to defeat terrorists abroad and in securing the cooperation of international partners.

http://www.state.gov/j/ct/

 

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyRMfZXPxLA

Founded in 1996, the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT) is the leading academic institute for counter-terrorism in the world, facilitating international cooperation in the global struggle against terrorism. ICT is an independent think tank providing expertise in terrorism, counter-terrorism, homeland security, threat vulnerability and risk assessment, intelligence analysis and national security and defense policy.

http://www.ict.org.il/AboutICT/AboutUs/tabid/55/Default.aspx

The Combating Terrorism Center is an independent, privately funded, reserach and educational institution situated at West Point that informs and shapes counterterrorism policy and strategy.

http://www.ctc.usma.edu/

Color-coded terrorism alerts are issued, then lifted with no explanation. False alarms can, like crying wolf, desensitize people to a real need to be on alert. And that psychic numbing is just one effect discussed in this book by fifteen psychologists teamed up to take a critical look at the U.S. war on terrorism. These experts are led by the Chairman of an American Psychological Association task force charged with pinpointing the effect of our anti-terrorism efforts on American mental health. Together, they present the most up-to-date and intriguing picture we have of the fallout on our own people from our own programs. The text spotlights stereotyping of foreigners, increased domestic hate crimes, fear, depression and helplessness, as well as increased militancy and belligerence, especially among students. Perhaps most disturbing in the land of the free, we also see increasing acceptance of restrictions on our personal freedoms, and acceptance of human rights violations.

Color-coded terrorism alerts are issued, then lifted with no explanation. False alarms can, like crying wolf, desensitize people to a real need to be on alert. And that psychic numbing is just one effect discussed in this book by fifteen psychologists teamed up for a critical look at the U.S. war on terrorism. These experts are led by the Chairman of the American Psychological Association task force charged with pinpointing the effect of our anti-terrorism efforts on America’s mental health. Together, they present the most up-to-date and intriguing picture we have of the fallout on our own people from our own programs. The text spotlights fueled stereotyping of foreigners, increased domestic hate crimes, fear, depression and helplessness, as well as increasing militancy and belligerence, especially among students. Perhaps most disturbing in the land of the free, our attention is drawn to growing acceptance of restrictions on our personal freedoms, and acceptance of human rights violations.

Contributors to this collection aim to give us a reality check, looking at what our national reactions to terrorism have been, how those reactions have affected the psyche of our people and whether this has made us stronger or weaker, and more or less likely to be the target for future attacks.

Book by Paul Kimmel (Editor), Chris E. Stout (Editor) 

This publication comprises the revised texts of a series of three lectures, the Aggrey-Frazer- Guggisberg Memorial lectures, delivered by the renowned scholar, at the University of Ghana in 2002. The first lecture explores globalisation as the product of religion, technology, economy and empire. It postulates that globalisation can be positive or negative, depending upon the values it is realised. The second lecture raises question such as: Is there such a thing as ‘global Africa’? Has the ‘black experience’ itself been globalised, with Ghana as a major actor in that globalisation? How does this relate to the shadow of terrorism and counter-terrorism? The third lecture focuses on some of the key personalities of Africa’s anti-colonial history, examining how Africa has sought to move from the shadows of globalisation, in quest of an empowered and constructive role in the global order.

Book by Ali MAzrui

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=9964302967/themauduitgroupA/

Abject poverty and official corruption make parts of Africa a very attractive destination for terrorist organizations. Opportunities have developed during the pre-9/11 and post 9/11 periods in Africa for the recruitment of terrorists, attainment of bases of operations and sources of funding for Al Qaeda or its affiliated terror groups. This comprehensive volume provides an extensive examination of major terrorist events in Africa and highlights internal and external indices to illustrate why Africa is so ripe for terrorism.

Book by John Davis

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=075467083X/themauduitgroupA/